Bride of the Week: Mallory Holland

Seeds of Love

Mallory and Adam braved the rain for a summer wedding full of family, friends and love.
Montana Neuenschwander

Mallory Holland and Adam Iffland grew up just 15 minutes apart, had parents who knew each other and shared mutual friends. Yet it still took a chance meeting one night in Toledo, Ohio for the two to connect.

It was Adam’s chivalry that caught the bride-to-be’s eye that evening. When her necklace broke, he instantly came to her aid and fixed it. “It’s hard to find a handy man these days,” says Mallory, cheekily. Soon after, the two discovered they had a lot in common. “I am a farmer’s daughter and he’s the son of a farmer and farms himself,” Mallory explains. “I think our similar upbringing gave us an instant connection. A love of the land and agriculture is in our blood.”

“Walking into the tent and seeing so many people crammed together, all there for us. I really can’t express the feeling. It was chaotic, exciting, loving and a memorable moment. It made me really appreciate our family and friends who were willing to weather the rain for us,” the bride shares.

Little did they know during their five-year courtship that Mother Nature would test them on their wedding day, threatening to rain out a huge outdoor bash for an astounding 825 guests. Mallory did have a giant tent to protect people from the elements. Only it could fit about 300, comfortably. The other 500 guests would be left to their own devices. “The smaller the town, the larger the wedding,” explains the bride.

If the wedding was to go as planned on August 10, 2012, after a ceremony at the local Holy Trinity Catholic Church where Mallory’s family attends, family and friends were to gather at Centennial Terrace, a huge outdoor music venue. Part reception, part party, the celebration would include everything from a photo booth, a live band and a Mexican food buffet to a cigar bar, a popcorn bar and even a “liquor luge” (“as a late night surprise to guests,” explains the bride).

But the rain had other ideas. Most people arrived at the event without getting wet. They got to see the bride in her slim, A-line strapless gown with a sweeping train in a light gold hue by Maggie Sottero. Her gold chapel-length veil and hand-made bouquet, fashioned from antique brooches she collected from family, completed her self-described “retro” look. (Brooches also replaced corsages for the bride and groom’s mothers, grandmothers and aunts.)

For the reception, guests were treated to a vibrant atmosphere in plum, navy and chartreuse. “With it being an outdoor venue, I felt the bold colors helped to anchor things rather than get lost in the openness,” explains Mallory. Due to the chance of rain, Mallory estimates that the actual number of guests whittled down to about 600, crowded as best they could into a tent meant for half that size.

The effect of this sight on the bride was unforgettable.

“Walking into the tent and seeing so many people crammed together, all there for us. I really can’t express the feeling. It was chaotic, exciting, loving and a memorable moment. It made me really appreciate our family and friends who were willing to weather the rain for us,” she shares. 

Just when dinner was served, the skies opened and it poured. Looking back, says the bride, she’d do it all over again: “Overall, my vision was a little different, but we had a great night. In reality, that’s all that really matters.”

--Erinn Bucklan

 
 
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